New York & New Jersey Campaign > Landing at Kip's Bay

Landing at Kip's Bay

Background

The Landing at Kip's Bay was a British amphibious landing during the New York Campaign in the American Revolutionary War on September 15, 1776, occurring on the eastern shore of present-day Manhattan. Heavy advance fire from British naval forces in the East River caused the inexperienced militia guarding the landing area to flee, making it possible for the British to land unopposed at Kip's Bay.

Skirmishes in the aftermath of the landing resulted in the British capture of some of those militia. British maneuvers following the landing very nearly cut off the escape route of some Continental Army forces stationed further southeast on the island. The flight of American troops was so rapid that George Washington, who was attempting to rally them, was left exposed dangerously close to British lines.

The operation was a British success. It forced the Continental Army to withdraw to Harlem Heights, ceding control of New York City on the lower half of the island. However, General Washington established strong positions on Harlem Heights, which he defended in a fierce skirmish between the two armies the following day. General Howe, unwilling to risk a costly frontal attack, did not attempt to advance further up the island for another two months.

New York & New Jersey Campaign Battles

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